Billie says her baggy look isn’t a reaction against ‘more traditionally feminine’ clothes Billie Eilish has hit out at “slutshaming” over her fashion choices. Eilish is known for often wearing baggy clothes. But she reaffirmed that her clothing is simply how she prefers to dress, rather than trying to make a statement against women who choose a more traditionally feminine look. “The positive comments about how I dress have this slutshaming element,” Eilish told V. “Like, ‘I am so glad that you’re dressing like a boy, so other girls can dress like boys, so that they aren’t sluts’. That’s basically what it sounds like to me. And I can’t overstate how strongly I do not appreciate that, at all.” View this post on Instagram | 𝕾𝖕𝖊𝖑𝖑𝖇𝖔𝖚𝖓𝖉 | Superstar. Defiant. Gen Z. “Bad Guy.” You just can’t put a label on @billieeilish. Having conquered the music world by breaking every rule imaginable, the 17-year-old superstar is redefining success as she navigates it, experiencing both the beauty and gore of fame. This year, she became the third
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Disney on Broadway continues its 25th anniversary celebration in partnership with the Fashion Institute of Technology, creating a unique design challenge for students to reimagine contemporary designs for some of Disney on Broadway’s iconic female characters. The partnership is a first between Disney on Broadway and the college, which will soon be celebrating its 75th anniversary. The design challenge represents the work of 10 FIT Fashion Design students whose designs were selected from among nearly 100 submissions. The student finalists, who are from all over the world, will have their garments on display in an exhibition at the Art and Design Gallery located in FIT’s Pomerantz Art and Design Center from September 19-October 6. A press preview will be held on September 24 at 3 pm in the same space. The students and their Disney on Broadway design inspirations are: · Marianna Gonzalez, a fourth-year student from Brownsville, Texas, designing for Jane from Tarzan · Eunhye Jo, a third-year student from Seoul, South Korea, designing for Rafiki from The Lion King · Ashna Moogi, a
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The cult of the handmade as purveyed by Morris, who died in 1896, held sway until after World War I — the movement’s influence can still be seen in places as far-flung as Pasadena, Calif., where the Arts and Crafts bungalows designed by the architecture firm Greene and Greene in the 1920s remain — but by the middle of the century, the design world, enamored of unadorned Modernism, came to dismiss handicraft, once again, as mere decoration. Over the past decade and a half or so, however, a contemporary English aesthetic, one that rejects the confines of polished minimalism, has announced itself. With raw energy, puckish intelligence, local materials and fine handwork, it invokes the region’s pastoral agrarian roots, echoing Morris’s call to return to preindustrial workmanship, with ceramists, basket weavers and textile designers as the drivers of innovation and creativity. The British design ethos has turned from a whitewashed, sharp-edged spareness intended to clash defiantly with the country’s historic architecture toward a craggy, hand-turned naturalness that seems at peace with it. Showrooms such as
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Tracking down student organizations on campus can be tough. With over 1,000 registered clubs on campus that recruit anywhere from Facebook to Bruinwalk, it’s easy to get lost. Here are nine well-established student clubs for new students to explore. VITA at UCLA Volunteer Income Tax Assistance at UCLA trains hundreds of student volunteers how to file state and federal income taxes. Volunteers then offer their services to local low-income communities, as well as to UCLA staff and other students. Volunteers can join in fall and winter quarters and participate in four to eight weeks of training. After training, they volunteer at tax clinics around UCLA and Los Angeles, guiding attendees through the income tax process and teaching them tips and tools. UCLA DevX Students involved with UCLA DevX code and develop projects to make life on campus easier for students. Current projects include a UCLA dating app, a map app to consolidate campus events, a school ride-sharing app and a web platform to help students find on-campus organizations. Students can join as designers, back-end developers,
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LAWRENCE — When you look good, you feel good, as the saying goes. And that saying is the principle that fuels Uncommon Threads, a Lawrence nonprofit that helps empower and enrich the lives of women in need through fashion. “Our self-esteem goes way up when we like what we are wearing and how we look. Clothes are a way of lifting people up,” said Susan Kanoff, founder of Uncommon Threads at 60 Island St. Uncommon Threads assists women in need, whether they be domestic violence survivors, in recovery, unemployed, underemployed or homeless. The organization provides outfits for job interviews, parties, special events and even just everyday looks. “If someone needs our help, we will help them,” said Kanoff, speaking to a group organized by attorney Kelly Longtin, a Methuen resident. Longtin, a partner with DeBruyckere Law Offices, regularly hosts estate planning workshops. She is always looking for ways to give back to the communities the law offices serve. At an event last week at Angelica’s in Middleton, those who attended were asked to bring a
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Posted on Aug 17, 2019 By Patsy Isenberg Is fashion art? Designer Isaac Mizrahi said on the CBS News show Sunday Morning in 2016, ”Some fashion belongs in museums… some really doesn’t… sometimes you do go into a museum where they have a show of clothing, and it does feel like a store window…” Still, museums are exhibiting fashion more frequently these days, and the debate goes on. In answer, the current exhibit at the Flint Institute of Arts is fashion, craft, history and, yes, definitely art. The massive exhibit of life-sized recreations of fashion, Fashioning Art from Paper, is located in the Hodge and Henry galleries across from the FIA theater. Recreated kaftans (Photo by Patsy Isenberg) The Belgian artist who created them, Isabelle de Borchgrave, was born in 1946. According to the catalog accompanying the exhibit, available in the FIA gift shop, De Borchgrave began to study art after quitting regular school when she was only 14. Her parents supported it because she had such a strong inclination to draw, paint and create art from
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